Scientists

Speakers

Micheal Greenwood

Micheal Greenwood

University of Bristol, UK

Micheal Greenwood

Biography

Mike is a Research Fellow at the University of Bristol. He has contributed as an author to 44 peer-reviewed academic journals, and additionally 1 review article and 2 chapters in research books. His research focus throughout his early career has been on osmoregulatory mechanisms in vertebrates. He carried out his PhD studies at the University of Manchester in the laboratory of Professor Richard Balment researching calcium regulating endocrine systems in the European flounder, Platichthys flesus. Moving from Manchester to the laboratory of Professor David Murphy at the University of Bristol gave him the exciting opportunity to work in a world leading neuroendocrinology laboratory using omic techniques at the core of their studies in rats.

His research focuses on a special collection of neurones in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. Magnocellular neurones make the peptide hormones arginine vasopressin and oxytocin and release them peripherally into the blood circulation from nerve terminals in the pituitary gland. Once secreted, these peptides modulate physiological parameters such as blood osmolality, blood pressure and blood glucose by acting on specific receptors in the periphery to maintain homeostasis. He has successfully progressed from large data sets of genes not previously familiar to the hypothalamus to novel molecular and physiological understanding, an approach that has transformed the neuroendocrine field. Interestingly, these neurones express receptors for several gut peptides, so integrate signals from endogenous gut peptides as well as new pharmacological circuits created by incretin mimetics that are being used in the clinic for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. He is currently investigating the gut-to-pituitary axis in rodents and humans. When not in the lab he enjoys exploring the great outdoors and fishing.

Description of the general focus of the symposium "Neuroendocrine Brain"

In this symposia, the overall theme will be about the neuroendocrine brain with a large focus on the neurohypophysis, a major evolutionarily conserved neuroendocrine interface with functions in reproduction and water balance. The speakers are chosen in such a way - that each talk will touch an important aspect of neuroendocrine brain. The inter-organ signaling between the gut and the brain by Mike Greenwood (Univ. of Bristol, UK), the clinical aspect by Svenja (Univ. Basel Hospital, Switzerland), the circular RNA's by Julian (IBCH, Poznan), invertebrate neuropeptide role in immunity by Natalia (UAM Poznan) and finally a role of glia in the zebrafish neurohypophysis by Naveen (UAM Poznan). The symposia will unite researchers using different model organism, questions, techniques and functions. Mike and Svenja are PhD holders, while Julian, Natalia and Naveen are PhD students.

Talk: "Dynamic integration of ingestive behaviours and homeostasis by magnocellular neuron gut peptide receptors"

The magnocellular neurones (MCNs) in the hypothalamus make the peptide hormones arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) and release them peripherally into the blood circulation from nerve terminals in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland (PP), and centrally from dendrites and axon collaterals. Once secreted, these peptides modulate physiological parameters such as blood osmolality, blood pressure and blood glucose by acting on specific receptors to maintain homeostasis. There is a resurgence in interest in mechanisms regulating AVP and OXT release, which stems from clinical associations with body mass index, and consequently diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. When we eat a meal the gut releases hormones, aptly grouped as gut peptides, to control the amount of food and fluid we ingest by acting on specific receptors to promote a feeling of fullness. Interestingly, MCNs express receptors for gut peptides GLP-1, GIP and CCK at nerve terminals in the PP, and I will present our data on how those receptors integrate signals from circulating gut peptides.

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